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The story of how I saved money, quit my job, sold my possessions, and set off to endlessly travel by bike around the world. My Plan

My 3 Books
I write, self publish and sell books about touring

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Continue My Travels


Places I have been
(
How can I afford this?)

India and Neighbors
May 2010 to present

Alaska / Canada / USA
May 2008 to April 2010

New Zealand
Sept 2007 to May 2008

Australia
Sept 2006 to Sept 2007

SE Asia / China
Nov 2004 to Sept 2006

South America
June 2003 to June 2004

AZ, Mexico, and Central America
March 2002 to April 2003

How I started
The 5 years before I left


*Help Support this Web Site and Continue My Travels.


Equipment Pages Index

Introduction
How Much to Bring and Weight
Some Advice About Advice
A Note to Perspective Sponsors and Gear Suppliers
(See more about Sponsorship)

START HERE for Touring Bikes and Commuting Bicycles
Custom Touring Bicycles and Bike Upgrade Buyers Guide
Bicycle Touring Frames 
The Steel Repair Myth.
Steel and Aluminum Derailleur Hanger Repair.
Bicycle Touring Wheels
Phil Wood: The Best Bicycle Hubs

Panniers / Bike Bags
Cargo Trailers Vs Panniers
Tires for Bike Tours..
Bicycle Touring Saddles.
Women's Specific Bike Touring Saddles
Brooks Leather Touring Bicycle Saddle Care and Conditioning
Bike Computer
Touring Handlebars, Bar Ends, Adjustable Stems, and Padded Grips.
Kickstands
Sealed Cartridge Headsets

How to prevent flat tires
Bike Route Trails and Maps

Camping
Buying Camping Equipment
Tent and Ground Cloth
Sleeping Bag
Sleeping Pad
Camp Stove
Pots and Pans
Water Filter
First Aide Kits
Solar Power for Camp

Clothing
Bike Touring Shorts

Electrical
Short-wave Radio
Computer
Internet
mp3
Bicycle touring lights

Books
Packing list
Pictures of Equipment Failures
Shopping


See My Videos Here



(see all 3 book)

Bicycle Touring Tool Kit and Spare Parts List to Carry on a Bike Tour:

Topeak Deluxe Kit

What do you have in your panniers to tackle those roadside emergencies and breakdown?

The most common Roadside Repairs - Three levels of tools to carry on a bicycle tour

 

Touring bicycle often require roadside repairs.  The Tools and Spares carried in your panniers are possibly the most important components of your bike touring gear.  Your tool kit is unlike most of the other gear onboard, it's the part you dread having to put to use. The right tool or spare can save your bike tour but tools are heavy and having too much will weigh a cycle down.  there's no point in carrying tools you don't know how to use even though they could save the day.  Emergancy repairs will require expierance with tools and lot of ingenity to make on the fly repairs   So here is the dilima; as a bike tourist you want to be independent and keep your touring bicycle rolling no matter how bad your luck but you never want to carry too much because the engine of your adventure is you the cyclist.


Determining Factors to Help You Choose Tool Kits

When building your tool and spare kit, consider where and how long your trip will be, along with your mechanical aptitude. In my experience, the longer the tour, the bigger the tool kit you'll need.

Travel in less-developed countries requires carrying more spare parts, as there will be less real bike shops. A two-year tour through Asia will require an extensive set of tools and spare parts.  Developing countries do have bike shops, but rarely carry high end parts. Relying on bike shops  saves lots of weight, but leaves much more to chance.

 On the other hand, a loaded tour lasting one to six months in a developed country (US/Canada/Europe) requires a smaller tool and spare kit. For example,  a three month trip across the USA requires minimal tools. Bike shops are abundant in America and, assuming you begin with a well-maintained set of wheels, three months is not really enough time  to expect major breakdowns

 For touring cyclists on extended trips through undeveloped parts of the world, riders should be prepared to deal with the occasional breakdown and major repairs.   Of course, just having the right tool is not enough. I recommend taking the time to learn and practice bike repairs before the trip begins. It's much easier to learn to replace a broken spoke in a workshop than on the side of the road.  (read more about determining factors for bike tour tool kits)

 Tools for bicycle touring have to be lightweight enough to be carried in bike panniers or a seat bag yet be adequate to cover all the emergency road side repairs and regular maintenance.  In my opinion, mini folding all-in-one tools are not optimal for long tours.


What Are The most common Roadside Repairs?

This take a bit more than paragraph to explain so I made a page about the most common breakdowns and repairs touring cyclist experience. Basically, on a short tour, under three weeks, you may not have any mechanical issues but after 3-6 months problems should be expected and you need to be prepared with enough tools and spares to be self contained and self sufficient

Of cauerce a lot more can go wrong than the list below; I have experienced about everything possible, but it will give you a good idea of what most travelers on a bicycle can look forward too

- flat tire - see preventing flat tires
- replace broken spoke
- replace broken cables
- repair broken chain
- tightening bolts
- adjusting gears
- true wheels
- clean and lube chain and more

Three levels of tools to carry on a bicycle tour

I spend a whole page explaining this in more detail but here is a summery.  There are a lot of ways of categorizing tool kit but I like to boil it down to three different levels of riders/travelers.  This does not include some emergency parts like Zip Ties and hose clamp (see my full gear list here)  make page with this stuff

Day Rider

Intermediate 3 to 6 Month Bike Touring

Advanced Long International Bike Tours

Anyone at any ability who does most of their repairs at home and just needs the minumem on their regular rides.

pump (my description)
tire levers
patch kit
tubes

multi tool with
- allen key set
- wrenches
- chain tool
- screwdrivers
- spoke wrench

Presta Valve adapter
- if needed

chain joining links x 2 -
 

Everything on the day rider list with some extras.  An option for the mechanically minded is to ditch the folding multi tool and replace it with individual tools and a Leatherman with pliers.

pressure gauge
Real chain tool
spoke wrench
better alien keys Set
cassettet remover
8 and 10 mm wrenches
cone wrench

temp spoke - real spokes

at least one derailer cable

leatherman
- blades can cook with
- pliers
- screwdrivers
- other tools
 extra short length of chain
chain lube - rag

If Needed

Headset Wrench
Pedal wrench

 (if not using a 8mm allen key)

Everything from the day rider and intermediate catagory plus enough tools and parts to do major repairs and maintence while traveling far from modern bike shops

real allen keys (this may include 8mm to take off newer pedals)
chainring bolt tool
cable cutters
bottom bracket tool
4 brake pads
extra cables and housing = 2 full set

extra tire
chain

stove repair

saddle repair

bike grease

bb tool

 


What Do I Do?

chose

More Information Here

Most commim road side touring bike repairs

Determining Factors in choosing Bicycle Touring Tool Kits

3 types of cyclist/bike tourist and 3 different tool list

How to Prevent Flat Tires

list of tools - title = recommended Bike tool kits for bicycle touring

link to other repair kits - stove - tent - pannier - sewing - sleeping pad

saving money while traveling page

Free Camp while Bicycle Touring

How to Prevent Flat Tires

 

 


 

 

32mm head wrench/pedal wrench combo (if not using a thread-less system)

 Brookes saddle wrench


Disk brake torque wrench


pictures of hose clamp - zip tie more

spare tubes

1 or 2 spare tubes are fine for day rides, 3 for intermeduate tours and more for longer tours.  It all depends on tube availability on your route

chain replacement section with extra joining links

gear and brake cables and housing

Not needed for day rides, 1 derailer cable is min for intermediate tour and 2 complete sets of brake and dshifter cable and housing

emergancy flex spoke

frame bolts short

electrical tape

zip ties

- electrical. tape

- zip ties

duct tape

super  glue

spokes

hose clamp

folding spare tire

if you are starting with new tires on short trip not needed but essential on ling trips

spare brake pads

an old pair with a little fife left in them is fine for short trips but 2 new sets is recomended for long trip

bike grease

 

Spares:

 

 spare spokes spare bolts and screws of all sizes chain lube (illegal to carry Teflon based lubes on airplanes now) grease (waterproof grease) cable ties duct tape

 


If you tour long enough you will eventually break something that can't be fixed with your toold.

 





 

 

 

Pump, Tire Levers, and the Basics 

 

Bicycle Touring
Tips & Advice

- Bike Stuff
- Camping

Touring Bicycles
Panniers
Racks
Saddles
Tires
Lights

Fenders
Tools and Spares

Tents
Sleeping Bags
Camping Mattress
Camp Stove
Water Filter
Pots and Pans
First Aide Kits
Solar Power
Bike Maps
Preventing Flat Tires

Bike Computer
Cargo Trailers
Kick Stands
Pedals
Handelbars/Grips
Headsets
Commuting Bikes

Camp Shower/Toiletry Bag

Lights

Helmet
Bike Shoes
Bike Touring Shorts

Stealth/Free Camp

What I Have Learned On The Road

Dreaming of Endless Travel

Injustice of Poverty

Much MORE Gear Here!

Sponsors (how?)


Cycle Touring Racks

Tents and ground cloths
Sleeping Bags
Camping Mattress Pads


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