Pictures Letters Journals Bikes Camp Plan Funding/Cost MyBooks Media Support Contact

search DownTheRoad.org

Custom Search


The story of how I saved money, quit my job, sold my possessions, and set off to endlessly travel by bike around the world. My Plan

My 3 Books
I write, self publish and sell books about touring

HOME
Videos
Picture Gallery
Journals
Travel Plan

Finances
Shopping
Equipment
My Books
About Me
Media/Press Room

Contact

Photo Use Info

Read Sample Letter
Continue My Travels


Places I have been
(
How can I afford this?)

India and Neighbors
May 2010 to present

Alaska / Canada / USA
May 2008 to April 2010

New Zealand
Sept 2007 to May 2008

Australia
Sept 2006 to Sept 2007

SE Asia / China
Nov 2004 to Sept 2006

South America
June 2003 to June 2004

AZ, Mexico, and Central America
March 2002 to April 2003

How I started
The 5 years before I left


*Help Support this Web Site and Continue My Travels.


Equipment Pages Index

Introduction
How Much to Bring and Weight
Some Advice About Advice
A Note to Perspective Sponsors and Gear Suppliers
(See more about Sponsorship)

START HERE for Touring Bikes and Commuting Bicycles
Custom Touring Bicycles and Bike Upgrade Buyers Guide
Bicycle Touring Frames 
The Steel Repair Myth.
Steel and Aluminum Derailleur Hanger Repair.
Bicycle Touring Wheels
Phil Wood: The Best Bicycle Hubs

Panniers / Bike Bags
Cargo Trailers Vs Panniers
Tires for Bike Tours..
Bicycle Touring Saddles.
Women's Specific Bike Touring Saddles
Brooks Leather Touring Bicycle Saddle Care and Conditioning
Bike Computer
Touring Handlebars, Bar Ends, Adjustable Stems, and Padded Grips.
Kickstands
Sealed Cartridge Headsets

How to prevent flat tires
Bike Route Trails and Maps

Camping
Buying Camping Equipment
Tent and Ground Cloth
Sleeping Bag
Sleeping Pad
Camp Stove
Pots and Pans
Water Filter
First Aide Kits
Solar Power for Camp

Clothing
Bike Touring Shorts

Electrical
Short-wave Radio
Computer
Internet
mp3
Bicycle touring lights

Books
Packing list
Pictures of Equipment Failures
Shopping


See My Videos Here



(see all 3 book)

Surly Long Haul Trucker
Surly Cross Check
Surly Big Dummy
Trek 520
Cannondale T1000
Cannondale xxxxx
Salsa Fargo
Raligh Sonjorn
REI Safari
REI Randadeer

Nashbar

 

 

Print ArticleClose

How to Choose a Touring Bike

ust about any bike can be used for touring, as long as it's in good mechanical condition and it fits you well. But some bikes are better suited to the sport than others. It's fine to try a short tour or two on whatever bike you have available. Just remember that touring is far easier and more enjoyable when it is done with the right equipment.

Basic Bicycle Types

Here's a quick look at the main bicycle categories and how they stack up when it comes to touring:
  • Touring Bike
    Pluses: Touring bikes are designed to perform efficiently and comfortably for extended periods on smooth, hard surfaces. They achieve this through the use of tough, elongated frames and curved handlebars (touring-specific or like those found on racing bikes), allowing riders to pedal comfortably in lower, more aerodynamic postures.

    Most touring bikes offer wide gearing ranges for good performance on variable terrain. Most come with relatively narrow, high-pressure tires (to minimize rolling resistance and increase efficiency on paved surfaces). But many can be outfitted with wider tires to perform better on softer surfaces like trails and dirt roads.

    Minuses: Touring bikes are designed specifically for long-distance cycling. This means they tend to be less effective than other bikes for other kinds of cycling (mountain biking, racing).

  • Mountain Bike
    Pluses: Mountain bikes are designed to perform best on soft riding surfaces like dirt roads and trails. They usually have wider, lower-pressure tires for good grip and control, and heavier, beefier frames and components to handle rougher terrain. Mountain bikes are designed to handle heavy loads and most have convenient attachment points for racks. Most mountain bikes have wide gearing ranges, with lower gears for better performance on hills when carrying heavy loads.

    Minuses: Because of their wider, lower pressure-tires and heavier weights, mountain bikes are less efficient than touring and racing bikes on paved roads and other hard, smooth surfaces. However, most accept narrower tires. Their straight handlebars provide fewer hand positions but adding bar ends will give you more options. Mountain bike frame shapes cause most riders to sit up more vertically while riding, which increases wind resistance.

  • Town and Trail Bike
    Pluses: Town and trail bikes combine the ruggedness and go-anywhere nature of mountain bikes with the efficiency and road-readiness of bikes designed for paved surfaces. They offer a compromise to riders who are interested in riding and touring on a wide variety of riding surfaces. Compared to mountain bikes, these bikes usually have slightly narrower, high-pressure tires. They also offer elongated frame geometries that deliver better cruising on flat surfaces.

    Minuses: As a combination of two extremes, town and trail bikes cannot compete performance-wise with touring bikes on paved routes or with mountain bikes on rugged terrain. They're designed to provide reliable, basic performance on a mixture of riding surfaces. Most bikes of this type have straight, mountain bike handlebars, though curved bars can be substituted. They tend to be heavier than racing and touring bicycles.

  • Road Bikes
    Pluses: Lightweight and extremely efficient, road bikes are perfect for smooth, paved surfaces.

    Minuses: Road bikes are not designed for hours of comfortable riding, nor are they designed to handle bike bags or the added weight of big gear loads. Most do not have attachment points for racks or other storage accessories. Road bike gears are often designed for racing, not cruising, and their limited low gears can make climbing up long and/or steep hills, under load, difficult. Road bikes also tend to have very narrow tires, which on soft riding surfaces can be inefficient and hard to control.

Other Factors to Consider

Comfort
Touring cyclists spend a lot of time on their bicycles, so comfort is important. The overall fit of the bicycle, then, becomes extremely important. Check out our article on bicycle fit to learn more. The shape and padding of the saddle and handlebars, the position of the brake and shift levers and other factors also affect your comfort.

Efficiency
The easier a bike is to pedal mile after mile, the more enjoyment you'll get from touring. In general, the key to smooth cycling is a solid, well-made bike with high-quality bike components. Proper maintenance is also important. As noted earlier, the specific type of bike you use can play a major role since different bikes are designed for different riding surfaces.

Gearing Options
Gears affect how easy it is for you to pedal on variable terrain. Having lots of gearing options (especially low gears, which help make pedaling uphill easier) makes touring easier and more enjoyable.

Good Brakes
Reliable stopping power is always important. But when a bike is fully loaded with touring gear, it's even more critical. It's very important to check the physical condition of your brake system. Click here to learn more about basic brake maintenance.

Durability
Touring bikes must stand up to lots of miles and heavy loads. Durable frames and components will reduce the chance of mechanical breakdowns.

Bike Weight
Adult touring cyclists should look for bikes weighing around 25-30 pounds. Lighter bikes may be used for touring, but make sure they're durable enough to stand up to lots of hard riding.

Tires
Your bike tires can have a significant effect on performance. They can affect the rolling resistance of your bicycle as well as how it handles in various riding conditions and surfaces. Make sure your tires match up with the route you have planned before you leave home.

Attachment Points
Eyelets and braze-ons are frame attachment points that you can use to attach bike bags and other equipment. (All touring bikes have them.) They're not absolutely necessary for touring (some racks and bike bags can be attached directly to bike frames). But attachment points do make outfitting bikes for touring far easier.

 

 

 

 

 Continental Travel Contact Tire - 26 x 1.75

These cross-hybrid tires are larger in volume and feature a semi-slick tread that's versatile on and off the road. Puncture-resistance system protects the casing and inner tube from thorns, glass and debris. Endless Edge technology features specifically shaped knobs with five edges and five corners for superior handling in all conditions.

 


Top: Home Page
Up: Table of contents
Previous: Motor vehicle-bicycle-accidents
Next: Roadway design and maintenance


The ultimate go-anywhere machine - even off road. Fully integrated touring solution with equipment that is designed to work together.  Completely hand built frame of triple-butted, triple hardened 7005 aluminum.  Built-in attachment points for an elite grouping of included accessories. Tubus rear and low-rider racks use chrome-moly tubing that is 2x stronger than 6061 T6.  Mavic Extreme MTB 26" reinforced rims, dent-proof mudguards, dual kickstands.  Shimano ultra-durable XT group.  Rugged and fully equipped.  Ready for adventure.

The ultimate intergrated Bicycle Touring Solution.

Hand made touring bikes built specifically to meet the demands of extended bicycle touring.

Buying a Koga Miyata bicycle For Sale Store Shop


Koga Miyata Touring Bicycles are for sale in the USA from this site.

 

 

Koga Miyata Globe Traveler

STOP/AMAZING/itemMatrix.asp?CartId={4E60DF2F-037C-46E0EVEREST-8D0E-43E0D0B3F224}&GroupCode=BIKE003&eq=&MatrixType=1

The GlobeTraveller is the basic version of the GlobeTraveller line, in other words a trekking bike for the genuine purist. No suspension, but it does have optimum riding characteristics, as a result, among other things, of the strong, firm hand-built Alloy 7005 frame. There is plenty of space for all the luggage thanks to the Koga-Miyata Tubus trekking system. The Shimano XT-V brakes with Koga-Miyata's own unique Brake Power Control provide the necessary safety. No comfort at all? Of course there is: the sublime Selle Royal trekking Act-Tex gel saddle combats any form of saddle soreness. That way you can spend hours enjoying the surroundings: right across Europe, right across the other continents, with the GlobeTraveller! SPECIFICATIONS for the GlobeTraveller are: Head set Koga ball bearing/needle roller cartridge / Crank set Shimano XT FC-M752 44x32x22 teeth with chain ring guard, crank length 170mm / Seat pillar clip Alloy Seat pillar Koga Solace-C 31,4mm, absorbing adjustable / Saddle Selle Royal trekking act-tex gel / Spokes Sapim Leader Inox, silver / Rims Mavic T-520 36/40g., black / Tyres Schwalbe Marathon Plus 37mm, Smart Guard System, with reflection / Frame Completely hand-made TIG-welded frame, manufactured from Alloy 7005 triple hardened and double-butted tubing. Down tube super oversized and double ovalised for extra stability. With replaceable rear derailleur hanger and equipped with integral bosses for all frame-mounted components / Chain Shimano HG73, 110 links / Cassette Shimano XT CS-HG70, 9-speed, 11-32 teeth / Levers and cables Shimano XT ST-M750 STI / Brakes Shimano XT V-brakes BR-M750 with Koga-Miyata Brake Power Control / Handlebar grips Cushions Handlebar stem ITM Trekking adjustable / Handlebars ITM Synergic Randonneur with bag holder / Colour combination Titanium Front fork Unicrown cro-moly / Frame dimensions 47-50-54-57-60-63cm / Hubs Shimano XT FH-M752 40g., hub dynamo HB-NX30 36g., 100-135mm / Headlight B&M lumotec oval II senso / Instruction manual Koga-Miyata Trekking / Handlebar mirror B&M Cycle Star / Saddle bag Koga / Frame lock Axa SL-7 with Anti-theft chip (DPC)/ Prop stand Pletscher / Reflector In rear light / >Carrier strap Bibia / Rear carrier Koga Tubus trekking / Bottom bracket unit Shimano XT BB-ES71, 68-113mm / Rear light B&M D-toplight multi with 4 diodes / Pedals Koga VP-X91 Combi SPD type / Mudguards SKS Koga / Bell Koga compact oval / Pump Topeak Road Morph / Derailleur guard Alloy / Water bottle/holder Zefal Isotherm Alloy/Tacx allure / Derailleur shifters Shimano XT ST-M750 / Derailleurs Shimano XT RD/FD-M750 / Weight of complete bike approx. 16.3kg. Front rack Koga Tubus trekking with side prop stand.


Traveler

Versatile choice for extended touring, day rides and excursions in any weather. Handbuilt frame uses triple-butted and triple-hardened 7005 aluminum, replaceable rear derailleur hanger. Built-in attachment points for intelligently integrated accessories. Tubus cr-mo rear rack, hub dynamo light system, double-eyelet 700/622 rims. Shimano LX 27-speed MTB group. Well-equipped, integrated design. Your perfect freedom machine. SPECIFICATIONS for the Traveller are: Head set Koga ball bearing/needle roller cartridge / Frame Completely hand-made TIG-welded frame, manufactured from Alloy 7005 triple hardened and double-butted oval tubing, equipped with integral bosses for all frame-mounted components / Seat pillar clip Alloy / Seat pillar Selcof nr.48 26,8mm, black / Saddle Selle FLX leather / Spokes Sapim Leader Inox, silver / Koga double eyelet / Tyres Maxxis Overdrive reflective / Bottom bracket unit Shimano LX BB-ES51, 68-121mm / Chain Shimano HG73, 110 links / Pedals Koga VP-191 industrial bearing / Levers and cables Shimano LX ST-M570 / Brakes Shimano LX V-brakes BR-M570 with Koga-Miyata Brake Power Control / Handlebar grips Cushions / Handlebar stem ITM Trekking adjustable / Handlebars ITM Synergic Randonneur with bag holder / Colour combination Aspen green / Front fork Unicrown cro-moly / Frame dimensions 50-54-57-60-63-66cm / Rear hub Shimano LX 36g. FH-M570, Shimano Front hub dynamo, 36g., HB-NX32, 100-135mm / Rear light B&M D-toplight multi with 4 diodes / Instruction manual Koga-Miyata Trekking / Saddle bag Koga / Frame lock Axa SL-7 with Anti-theft chip (DPC) / Prop stand Pletscher / Reflector In rear light / Carrier strap Bibia / Rear carrier SL bike / Crank set Shimano LX FC-M572, 44x32x22 teeth with chain ring guard, crank length 170mm / Dynamo Shimano hub dynamo / Weight of complete bike approx. 17.4kg. / Headlight B&M Lumotec oval II sensor / Mudguards SKS Koga / Bell Koga compact oval / Pump Koga doubleshot / Water bottle/holder Zefal Isotherm Alloy/Tacx allure / Derailleur shifters Shimano LX ST-M570 / Derailleurs Shimano LX FD-M571/RD-M570 / Cassette Shimano LX CS-HG50, 9-speed, 11-32 teeth.


 

I have owned, ridden, worn out, and occasionally broke dozens of bicycles during my 25 + years of cycling.  During this time I have seen fads and hype come and go. You deffinately have to be critical of the various information out there.  some thing were -----  and other inventions actually have revinucialized cycling.  I have learned to let others have the newest gismo and stick to what works.  The absolute best bicycle I have seen on the internet or in use is the Koga line of touring bikes. 

Koga makes several bikes that will more than satify your bicycle touring needs and use.  World Traveler and Globe Traveler.  We bought two Koga World Travelers with the 26 inch wheel set but this is only based on our personal preferences.  If you prefer a 700c wheel touring bike then the Koga  and what we use the bikes for and where we travel.  Koga tour bikes are available at my favorite US bike shop Ped the Plan.  Besides being one of the few places  who can ship them anywhere in USA North America Canada.  If you buy your new Koga after clicking through from the link below we will send you a FREE copy our new book.  You can read about our adventures and maybe they will give you ideas for planning your own outing while your ultimate traveling bicycle is being processed. 

Please feel free to contact me through email and I will answer any questions that you may have or help you along in the decision making process. 


Story of our Kogas.  maybe page

found out ikes were available

found best bike shop for touring and Koga dealer at the last minute - was suprised with expert serviece and availability of stuff at ped the plan

bought bikes two days before we left

This was a big risk because there was no time to check out the bikes or even test ride them before we left the country.  What if the bikes did not measure up to our expectations or ??.

We landed in Bangkok and I easilly assembled the bikes in our hotel room.  From the very forst ride on those Thailand roads I knew that this bike was much better than the steel framed bike I had previously ridden.  After a few weeks I compiled the list below of what my new bike offered that is unavailable to brands of touring bikes availble in America.

bought bikes two days before we left

 

We landed in Bangkok and I easilly assembled the bikes in our hotel room.  From the very forst ride on those Thailand roads I knew that this bike was much better than the steel framed bike I had previously ridden.  After a few weeks I compiled the list below of what my new bike offered that is unavailable to brands of touring bikes available in America.

 


Unloaded is light and quick enough for club rides or trails

If you are interested in a Koga bike I recomend that you

Straight off the showroom floor this bike is ready to go on your first tour or around the world.  Take all of the guess work out of your next adventure.

saves endless amounts of time in researching and shopping for the right combination.

many of the parts are not normally available in the USA

integrated equipment not aftermarket add ons - everything works together as a unit.

Ortlieb Panniers

Tubus Racks - own page

Contintal Tires own page -that will last all the way across the USA

Brooks Saddle - Conquest copper rivets, leather

fenders

kickstands

Shimano M324 SPD binding/platform

lights

 

 Price Info

 


Koga Miyata

 

 

cc

 

 

 


Koga Miyata

 

Koga Miyata

 

 

 


ATA CYCLE  
1773 MASSACHUSETTS AVE.
CAMBRIDGE, MA 02140
PHONE 617-354-0907
[email protected]
www.atabike.com

ROLLIN' FAST CYCLE SPORTS  
104 MAIN ST.
LEBANON, NJ 08833
PHONE 908-236-9000
[email protected]

PEDAL THE PLANET  
350 RICHMOND RD.
LEXINGTON, KY 40509
PHONE 859-273-5856
[email protected]
www.pedaltheplanet.com

DAVE'S BIKE INFIRMARY  
440 GRANITE AVE.
MILTON, MA 02186
PHONE 617-696-6123
www.daves-bike.com

NEW HOPE CYCLERY  
404 YORK RD.
NEW HOPE, PA 18938
PHONE 215-862-6888
[email protected]
www.newhopecyclery.com

HARRIS CYCLERY  
1353 WASHINGTON ST.
WEST NEWTON, MA 02465
PHONE 617-244-9772
www.harriscyclery.com

 

 

Your touring is the single most important piece of equipment you will own.  A good bike will go the distance without giving any problems and the wrong bike will fail at the worst possible moment and possibly ruin your trip completely.  Your bicycle is no place to be cheap.

If you have been following our trips progress during our first two years you know that we were not very happy with our touring bikes.  If you one of the few that have followed our travels from the very beginning you know that I have always wanted a Koga Miyata bicycle and specifically the world traveler.  These bikes were unavailable in North America before we left in 2002 but they are now.  I bought one the very first chance I had during a visit to the USA.  If you are looking for a bike that will outperforn all of the others look no further.

Why a bike from Europe or Holland

http://usa.koga.com/

http://usa.koga.com/upload/template.asp?source=collections/7140468.jpg&caption=WorldTraveller

 

WORLDTRAVELLER
The ultimate go-anywhere machine - even off-road. Fully integrated touring solution with equipment that is designed to work together. Completely handbuilt frame of triple-butted, triple-hardened 7005 aluminum. Built-in attachment points for an elite grouping of included accessories. Tubus rear and low-rider racks use chrome-moly tubing that is 2x stronger than 6061 T6. Mavic Extreme MTB 26 reinforced rims, dent-proof mudguards, dual kickstands read more
Prices
USA USD 2,699.00

 

Frame
Completely handbuilt frame. Triple-butted and triple-hardened 7005 aluminum. Super-oversized oval top and down tubes. Built-in attachment points for all accessories, replaceable rear derailleur hanger
Fork
Wide Bone integrated aluminum
Color
Dark titanium brush
Sizes
50 54 57 60cm
Derailleurs
Shimano Deore XT (3x9)
Crankset
Shimano Deore XT 44/32/22t
Cassette
Shimano Deore LX 11-32t, 9 speed
Shift/Brake levers
Shimano Deore XT Dual Control
Brakes
Shimano Deore XT
Pedals
Shimano M324 SPD binding/platform
Front hub
Shimano Deore XT 36h
Rear hub
Shimano Deore XT 36h
Rims
Mavic EX721 Extreme MTB 26/559-21
Tires
Conti' TravelContact 26/559-47 reflect
Saddle
Brooks Conquest copper rivets, leather
Seatpost
Pro XLT 300mm
Handlebar
Pro Rise 600mm w/Pro short bar ends
Stem
ITM Trekking CNC adjustable
Headset
Cane Creek ZS-22 industrial bearing
Mudguards
SKS P-50 Chromoplastic 26"
Headlight
Smart Triple Beam
Rear light
AXA Omega II 50mm
Racks
Tubus Logo; Low-rider w/kickstand F
Bonus extras
Pump, Bottle/cage (2), Saddlebag, Rack strap, Bell, Ring lock, Kickstand (2), Derailleur guard

 

  WorldTraveller
Frame sizes 50-54-57-60cm
Frame Completely hand-built TIG-welded 26" frame. Tubes manufactured in triple-hardened and triple-butted 7005 aluminum. Top- and down tube oval and super oversized for extra stability. Equipped with integrated headset and a replaceable rear derailleur hanger.
Front Fork Alloy Wide Bone integrated
Color Dark titanium brush
Handlebar ITM Freetime Multigrip 53 Black
Stem ITM Trekking CNC Adj. 22,2 Black "three bolts"
Grips Koga Foam
Brake Shimano Deore XT BR-M760
Shift/Brake lever (r) Shimano Deore XT ST-M760
Shift/Brake lever (l) Shimano Deore XT ST-M760
B.P.C. Yes
Headset Cane Creek A-head ZS-2 industrial-bearing 1" Black
Chain Shimano CN-HG73 108 links
Front Hub Shimano Deore XT HB-M760 Black 36H 100mm
Rear Hub Shimano Deore XT FH-M760 Black 36H 135mm
Tires Continental TravelContact 47-559
Rims Mavic EX 721 559x21 36H CD "single eyelet"
Rim tape H.P. 650C 16mm
Spokes Sapim Leader Black
Saddle Selle Royal Brooks Conquest Black
Saddle cover Selle San Marco
Seat post Kalloy SP-368 "double bolts" 31,4x250mm Black
Seatclamp Koga Alloy Black
Crankset Shimano Deore XT FC-M760 44x32x22T with chainguard
Pedals Shimano PD-M324
Cassette Shimano CS-HG70 9-speed 11-12-14-16-18-21-24-28-32T
Rear Derailleur Shimano Deore XT RD-M760-SGS
Front Derailleur Shimano Deore XT FD-M760 T-swing 34,9 66-69
Derailleur guard Hodaka Alloy Black
Pump Topeak Roadmorph Small
Bottle Zefal 137 Alloy Brushed 2x
Bottle holder Elite Macan Black 2x
Bell Koga Widek Compact-II Silver
Mudguards SKS P-50 Titan
Headlight Cateye HL-EL110 Black/Brightled
Rear light B&M D-Toplight senso incl. 4 dioden
Rear carrier Tubus LOGO
Low-rider Tubus
Rubber strap Bibia Triobinder
Kickstand Pletscher Optima 1/260 Titan
Ring lock AXA SL-7 titan
Saddlebag Koga

 

Specifications for WorldTraveller

 

 

Koga Miyata touring bicycles are now available in the USA.

 

Suggested Retail Price: $2,290.00

Weight of Complete Bike: 34.8 lbs (15.8 kg)

Geometry

Frame size

Fs/mm

A/mm

B/mm

C/mm

D/mm

E/mm

F/mm

a

b

Naloop

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

50

500

530

425

597

1018

45

50

71

73

60

54

540

550

425

609

1030

45

50

71

73

60

57

570

570

425

630

1051

45

50

71

73

60

60

600

590

425

654

1075

45

50

71

73

60

 

 

 

Send mail [email protected] with questions or comments about this web site.
Last modified: 03/10/04

Alaska to Patagonia by bicycle - Tilmann Waldthaler rides the Koga-Miyata WorldTraveller-R to the end of the world. A 16,000 mile ride, which is the ultimate test for the cyclist and his equipment. As for the performance of his WorldTraveller-R Tilmann says the following:

 "Since leaving the frontier town of Guayaramerin I have traveled on an unbelievably bad "Highway" towards La Paz. At times I thought that I will never get to La Paz as the roads were so bad. I am very proud of the equipment which I have been supplied by my sponsors. The Koga Miyata WorldTraveller is a very fine and reliable Touring bike and I did not have any problems with the bike whatsoever. Many people had big doubts about the Magura Hydraulic brakes on a trip like this. But I can tell you that the brakes are super and are easily maintained if need arises. The Continental Travel Contact is the best thing I have ever had on a bike. I have put two new tires on the bike in Boulder Colorado and have traveled 12.000 Kilometers to from Boulder to La Paz with one puncture. To do this distance with only one puncture on route, it is a bikers dream. [...]"

 More from Tilmann's Pool of experience:

 "Since leaving Anchorage many months ago I have had some incredible experiences traveling through Canada and the USA. I feel very privileged to be able to traveling with the best equipment presently on the market. I do get a lot of emails from other travelers or people who are about to leave on their own trips asking me how the equipment I am using is standing up to the road conditions and the trip in general. When I answer their mails and tell them about my experiences I get sometimes emails back saying that they do not believe, that I have so few problems with the equipment. So what do you want me to do? Tell you the truth or tell you a bunch of lies?
I have had almost no problems with anything I am using during the trip. The
Koga Bike is fantastic and the VAUDE panniers are a class of their own. The Continental tiers (Goliath and Travel Contact) are the best tires I have ever had. The Magura Brakes and the Rohloff hub are standing up to the reliability these products are famous for. [...]"

 "I have been traveling with the Koga Miyata World Traveller since Anchorage and I have arrived yesterday in Victoria B.C. On my arrival in Anchorage about 7 weeks ago I had so much stuff with me that I decided to purchase a little B.O.B. Yak trailer for all the camping cooking and winter gear. In the meantime as I am traveling south towards warmer regions and I have sold the trailer again. Now I am traveling much lighter which of course is also better for the bike.
However I would like to recommend the bike for any serious longer trips, as it is the most comfortable and easy to handle touring bike. As a matter of fact I have met 5 other cyclist's and they too traveled with a
Koga Miyata WorldTraveller and were absolutely fascinated by the handling and the comfortable ride they had on their Koga WorldTraveller."

www.tilmann.com/englisch/index.htm

 

Anyone who explores the world by bike has a great number of choices: every point of the compass is a new option, a new challenge, a new adventure. The WorldTraveller is ready to take on the adventure. World travellers choose this bike because of its many unique features. The WorldTraveller is an extremely robust world bike, that handles any terrain effortlessly. Thanks to the adjustable suspension Koga-Miyata front fork, this bicycle also ensures a comfortable journey. The completely hand-built 26" frame, perfectly operating Magura Louise disc brakes, the Shimano XT equipment and Continental Travel Contact tyres; everything contributes in detail to a carefree trip in all circumstances. Naturally the WorldTraveller is hand-built; an added value that will prove its value anywhere in the world! SPECIFICATIONS for the WorldTraveller are: Head set Integrated A-head set Frame Completely hand-made TIG-welded 26" volgeveerd frame, manufactured from Alloy 7005 triple hardened and double-butted tubing. Down tube and top tube super oval oversized for extra stability. Replaceable rear derailleur hanger and equipped with integral bosses for all frame-mounted components, airshock with reboundcontrol and integrated head set. Seat pillar clip, Alloy Seat pillar Koga SP366 31.4mm, black. Saddle Selle Royal Trekking leather gel . Spokes Sapim Leader Inox, black. Rims Mavic X-223, 36g. disc black. Continental Travel Contact Tires 47mm, with reflection. Bottom bracket unit Shimano XT BB-ES71, 68-113mm. Chain Shimano HG73, 112 links. Pedals Koga VP-X91 Combi SPD type. Levers and cables Magura Louise. Brakes Magura Louise . Handlebar grips Koga Handlebar stem ITM Trekking adjustable A-head. Handlebars ITM Downhill Rock Alloy with barends, black. Colour combination Anthracite grey. Front fork Koga 266, adjustabl. Frame dimensions 47-50-54-57-60cm. Hubs Shimano XT HBM/FH-M756 36g. disc. 100-135mm. Headlight Cat Eye HL-1600, battery lighting. Instruction manual Koga-Miyata. Trekking Saddle bag. Koga Frame lock Axa SL-7 with Anti-theft chip (DPC). Prop stand Pletscher. Reflector In rear light. Carrier strap Bibia. Rear carrier Koga Tubus trekking . Crank set Shimano XT FC-M752, 44x32x22 teeth with chain ring guard, crank length 170mm. Rear light B&M D-toplight senso with 4 diodes. Weight of complete bike approx. 16.5kg. Mudguards SKS Koga. Bell Koga compact oval. Pump Topeak Road Morph. Derailleur guard Alloy. Water bottles: Zefal Isotherm Alloy/Elite. Derailleur shifters Shimano XT SL-M750. Derailleurs Shimano XT RD/FD-M750. Cassette Shimano CS-HG70, 9-speed, 11-32 teeth. Front rack Koga Tubus trekking with side prop stand.

 

eXTReMe Tracker

The ultimate go-anywhere machine - even off-road. Fully integrated touring solution with equipment that is designed to work together. Completely hand built frame of triple-butted, triple-hardened 7005 aluminum. Built-in attachment points for an elite grouping of included accessories. Tubus rear and low-rider racks use chrome-moly tubing that is 2x stronger than 6061 T6. Mavic Extreme MTB 26" reinforced rims, dent-proof mudguards, dual kickstands. Shimano's ultra-durable XT group. Rugged and fully equipped. Ready for adventure. SPECIFICATIONS for the WorldTraveller are: Head set Integrated A-head set Frame Completely hand-made TIG-welded 26" volgeveerd frame, manufactured from Alloy 7005 triple hardened and double-butted tubing. Down tube and top tube super oval oversized for extra stability. Replaceable rear derailleur hanger and equipped with integral bosses for all frame-mounted components, airshock with rebound control and integrated head set. Seat pillar clip, Alloy Seat pillar Koga SP366 31.4mm, black. Saddle Selle Royal Trekking leather gel. Spokes Sapim Leader Inox, black. Rims Mavic X-223, 36g. disc black. Continental Travel Contact Tires 47mm, with reflection. Bottom bracket unit Shimano XT BB-ES71, 68-113mm. Chain Shimano HG73, 112 links. Pedals Koga VP-X91 Combi SPD type. Levers and cables Magura Louise. Brakes Magura Louise . Handlebar grips Koga Handlebar stem ITM Trekking adjustable A-head. Handlebars ITM Downhill Rock Alloy with bar ends, black. Colour combination Anthracite grey. Front fork Koga 266, adjustable. Frame dimensions 47-50-54-57-60cm. Hubs Shimano XT HBM/FH-M756 36g. disc. 100-135mm. Headlight Cat Eye HL-1600, battery lighting. Instruction manual Koga-Miyata. Trekking Saddle bag. Koga Frame lock Axa SL-7 with Anti-theft chip (DPC). Prop stand Pletscher. Reflector In rear light. Carrier strap Bibia. Rear carrier Koga Tubus trekking. Crank set Shimano XT FC-M752, 44x32x22 teeth with chain ring guard, crank length 170mm. Rear light B&M D-toplight sensor with 4 diodes. Weight of complete bike approx. 16.5kg. Mudguards SKS Koga. Bell Koga compact oval. Pump Topeak Road Morph. Derailleur guard Alloy. Water bottles: Zefal Isotherm Alloy/Elite. Derailleur shifters Shimano XT SL-M750. Derailleurs Shimano XT RD/FD-M750. Cassette Shimano CS-HG70, 9-speed, 11-32 teeth. Front rack Koga Tubus trekking with side prop stand.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Koga Miyata

 

 

Anyone who explores the world by bike has a great number of choices: every point of the compass is a new option, a new challenge, a new adventure. The WorldTraveller is ready to take on the adventure. World travellers choose this bike because of its many unique features. The WorldTraveller is an extremely robust world bike, that handles any terrain effortlessly. Thanks to the adjustable suspension Koga-Miyata front fork, this bicycle also ensures a comfortable journey. The completely hand-built 26" frame, perfectly operating Magura Louise disc brakes, the Shimano XT equipment and Continental Travel Contact tyres; everything contributes in detail to a carefree trip in all circumstances. Naturally the WorldTraveller is hand-built; an added value that will prove its value anywhere in the world! SPECIFICATIONS for the WorldTraveller are: Head set Integrated A-head set Frame Completely hand-made TIG-welded 26" volgeveerd frame, manufactured from Alloy 7005 triple hardened and double-butted tubing. Down tube and top tube super oval oversized for extra stability. Replaceable rear derailleur hanger and equipped with integral bosses for all frame-mounted components, airshock with reboundcontrol and integrated head set. Seat pillar clip, Alloy Seat pillar Koga SP366 31.4mm, black. Saddle Selle Royal Trekking leather gel . Spokes Sapim Leader Inox, black. Rims Mavic X-223, 36g. disc black. Continental Travel Contact Tires 47mm, with reflection. Bottom bracket unit Shimano XT BB-ES71, 68-113mm. Chain Shimano HG73, 112 links. Pedals Koga VP-X91 Combi SPD type. Levers and cables Magura Louise. Brakes Magura Louise . Handlebar grips Koga Handlebar stem ITM Trekking adjustable A-head. Handlebars ITM Downhill Rock Alloy with barends, black. Colour combination Anthracite grey. Front fork Koga 266, adjustabl. Frame dimensions 47-50-54-57-60cm. Hubs Shimano XT HBM/FH-M756 36g. disc. 100-135mm. Headlight Cat Eye HL-1600, battery lighting. Instruction manual Koga-Miyata. Trekking Saddle bag. Koga Frame lock Axa SL-7 with Anti-theft chip (DPC). Prop stand Pletscher. Reflector In rear light. Carrier strap Bibia. Rear carrier Koga Tubus trekking . Crank set Shimano XT FC-M752, 44x32x22 teeth with chain ring guard, crank length 170mm. Rear light B&M D-toplight senso with 4 diodes. Weight of complete bike approx. 16.5kg. Mudguards SKS Koga. Bell Koga compact oval. Pump Topeak Road Morph. Derailleur guard Alloy. Water bottles: Zefal Isotherm Alloy/Elite. Derailleur shifters Shimano XT SL-M750. Derailleurs Shimano XT RD/FD-M750. Cassette Shimano CS-HG70, 9-speed, 11-32 teeth. Front rack Koga Tubus trekking with side prop stand.

BICYCLE EQUIPMENT, PARTS, ACCESSORIES

Overview.

During the last half of the-1960's a radical shift in bicycle purchases took place. The modern lightweight ten-speed bicycle began its domination of the bicycle market in America. The new user was the adult. In the next ten years more than 45 million new bikes were added to the market, more than doubling the number of bicycles in America. Today, following light sales in 1975 and 1976, strong growth has returned to the bicycle market, with annual sales during the next five years projected at 8-10 million per year. A healthy percentage of these will be ten-speeds ( 50%) .

This section of the report discusses the handling characteristics of the adult ten-speed, safety factors, safety accessories, bright clothing, and what effect equipment has on cause and prevention of accidents.

The Bicycle.

The bicycles used by the participants of Bike centennial were lightweight ten-speed machines. A few participants used three-speed bicycles, and one person cycled across the country on a single-speed bicycle. Ten- and fifteen-speed (a variation of the ten-speed that has an additional chainring) bicycles, in fact, comprised 98.9% of all bicycles in use on the trail. All but 10% of the bikes in use on the trail had 27-inch narrow tires (1-inch). The bikes averaged 28-30 pounds in weight.

This bike is often selected for long-distance touring for its lightness, low rolling friction, responsive handling, and flexibility for meeting the challenging terrain. Used properly, the bike allows greater bicycling efficiency. Following a few days of practice, distances of 40-60 miles can be handled with relative ease, and a day of 100 miles is within the reach of many.

Equipment Features.

There are many options in equipment on the ten-speed, and several play an important role in its handling and-the safety of its use for touring. The most basic part of the bike, the frame, is one of the more critical factors. The predominant frame type used on the trail was the diamond (traditional men's frame). Although nearly one-third of all riders were women, only 2.9% of the frames were the (women's) dropped tube frame; another 3.6% were the slanted mixte frame.

The diamond frame accounted for 91.2% of all frames in use. Another 1.6% of the frames were tandem. The diamond frame has excellent handling characteristics, is the lightest in weight and the strongest on the commercial market. Few people pay attention to their frame selection, other than to buy a size that feels right. However, when purchasing a frame for touring purposes it is important to choose a model that is not likely to shimmy. Bikes which are designed primarily for racing, or have a short wheelbase, thin gauge tubes, or short fork rake,. are all prone to shimmying on fast downhill descents. This phenomenon is especially likely when 20-30 pounds of weight is added to the rear of the bike (panniers), and sets up a swaying motion when the bike is turned. The hazard is especially pronounced for tall people who require frame sizes above 23 inches. Bicyclists are cautioned to check with their local bike dealer and announce the intended purpose of the bike, so that characteristics that lead to shimmying can be avoided. Also important in handling, a frame should be "tracked" when the bike is being set up by a bike shop. This simple, but precise, procedure is rarely done, but adds dramatically to the overall performance of a bicycle.

Wheels.

Most of the bicyclists (90%) rode the trail on the thin 27" x 1/4" tires found as standard equipment on most ten-speeds. Although this wheel is one of the most efficient,-and responsive in use, it is more fragile and prone to abuse. The wheel will not hold up to potholes, debris, and gravel as well as the once standard lightweight (26" x- 1 3/8"). We do not have sufficient data to suggest which wheel performs with greatest safety. For the time being it is suggested that bicyclists be informed of the different handling characteristics and be alerted to the specific hazards that may cause trouble.

Other Parts.

The drop style handlebars made up 95.7% of all handlebars along the trail. Brakes were hand controlled in 97.4% of cases, with 22.1% of the riders using the brake extension levers as an added feature. An unusually high percentage of riders (94.8%) used toe clips for added efficiency. Used properly, toe clips cut down on accidents by preventing foot slippage.

Breakdowns, Part Failures.

Bikecentennial riders were asked to list any parts that failed during the summer. The ten-speed bike, if well maintained, continues to perform well. However, many riders started out on ill-maintained bikes, and subjected the machines to severe conditions. The "working parts" of the ten-speed bicycle are exposed to the elements. Derailleurs, chain, crankset, sprockets, freewheel, and brakes are all components that are vulnerable to damage from impact, mud, grit, maladjustment and wear. In order to enjoy a bicycle to the fullest extent and with the greatest safety, the rider must have at least some basic knowledge of the mechanical principles required to keep a bike well maintained. Derailleur cables and brake cables need to be set at the proper length, front and rear derailleur adjustment screws have a proper setting, spokes must have the proper tension to provide wheel alignment and roundness, tires must be kept at proper inflation pressure, and all bearings, including those found in the headset, bottom bracket, pedals, and axles, have a proper adjustment.

The influence of a trained leader and the environment of a small group were ideal for the instruction of basic maintenance and impromptu seminars on the care of various bicycle components. We feel confident that this was a contributing factor in reducing bicycling accidents for the long-distance cyclists.

Of the accessories and parts that did fail, the components associated with the power train (sprocket, chain, freewheel, cluster, and derailleurs) failed most frequently.

Power Train Parts that Failed  
  Rear Derailleurs. 8.8%
  Front Derailleurs 5.9%
  Chains 9.0%
  Freewheels 9.0%
  Cranksets 6.8%
Non-Power Train Parts that Failed  
  Pedals 5.5%
  Brakes 3.4%
  Rims 6.4 %
  Seats 4.1%
  Seat Posts 0.6%
  Handlebars 0.2%
  Hubs 4.6%
  Spokes 29.6%
  Headsets 2.5%
  Other Items 10.9%

Accessories.

The common accessories used by a bicycle tourist include a rear carrier, rear panniers, front handlebar bag, water bottles, and a tire pump. In addition, tents, sleeping bags, camp stoves, and cooking pots are often strapped to the rear of the bicycle with shock cords. Since we noted a nearly triple accident rate for bicyclists transporting equipment with packs and carriers, we examined accessories closely.

Carriers. Most everyone used a bolt-on carrier, which lacks rigidity under a load and tends to allow the weight to shift back and forth, especially when climbing a mountain or in a sudden turn to avoid a pothole, gravel or debris. An unexpectedly high percentage (13.8%) of riders reported that their carrier failed. A well-designed carrier system should include:

  1. Rigidity
  2. Low center of gravity
  3. Secure frame attachment (brazed or clamped at two points)
  4. Structural stays capable of supporting load
  5. Level top
  6. Access to brake mechanism

Panniers and Handlebar Bags. Bicycle panniers, packs, and handlebar bags received a thorough workout during the summer's activities. Most of the problems with these accessories centered around the fastening devices. Velcro straps came loose, and some metal snaps sheared off. In either case the bag could fall into the wheel, causing a serious accident. The failure rate for panniers and handlebar bags was 15.1%. Our feeling is that considerable study is needed toward reducing the frequency and seriousness of these accidents.

Safety Accessories.

To encourage safety, Bikecentennial recommended basic safety equipment to aid in visibility of the cyclist, detection of overtaking traffic, and protection of the head. These safety items and their value is discussed below.

Rearview Mirror. The most popular mirror is a small one-inch square glass mounted on eyeglass frames or the visor of a helmet. The design resembles the standard dentist's mirror. Worn two inches from the eye, the mirror provides an excellent view of approaching traffic with a slight twist of the head. This allows the rider to be aware of any potential hazard without having to turn around, a maneuver that causes the rider to sway into traffic. It is difficult to estimate how many accidents were avoided through the use of such a mirror; however, about 16% of the riders used such mirrors, and no riders using such mirrors were hit by an overtaking motor vehicle. Further, it was through the use of a rearview mirror that a cyclist had information to testify at a coroner's court in Dillon, Montana, about the events that led to the death of one of the TransAmerica bicyclists. Other types of mirrors in use include a wrist-mounted mirror and a standard handlebar-mounted mirror. The handlebar-mounted mirrors are not popular among bicycle tourists due to their ineffectiveness due to vibration, difficulty of adjustment, weight, and potential of being brushed by an overtaking auto.

Helmets. Bicycle helmets are credited with having protected several riders from serious concussions. About 270 of the riders reported they used a helmet on their trip. However, those having accidents disclosed that only 22% were wearing a helmet at the time of their accident. Hot weather and other factors led to a number of helmets being carried on the back of the bike, leaving the rider unprotected. Getting adequate ventilation and head protection is a real dilemma for the bicyclist, since most tourists ride during the hot summer months. Inadequate ventilation could cause heat exhaustion or other illness.. Additional study is needed in helmet design. Important characteristics of the well-designed helmet are as follows:

  1. Lightness in weight
  2. Protection from axially and radially directed impacts
  3. Ventilation
  4. Light color and reflectivity

Fanny Bumpers and Safety Flags. Bikecentennial issued a fanny bumper or safety flag to all group cyclists to increase their visibility on the road. A fanny bumper is an orange fluorescent triangle, international symbol of slow-moving vehicles. These items, along with bright clothing and equipment, are credited with reducing the number of overtaking accidents., About 70% of the riders stated they frequently wore bright clothing. In contrast, 52.3% of the accident victims said that they were wearing bright clothing on the day of their accident. Fanny bumpers and safety flags could be seen from distances of 200-600 yards, often well before the actual rider was clearly distinguishable. Motorists have been reported to be more cautious in their approach to riders displaying these added safety devices. Based on our observations, it is our belief that bright clothing and reflective safety devices such as fanny bumpers and flags are a helpful deterrent to bike/motor vehicle-related accidents. The value of such items becomes especially important during twilight, in fog, and on cloudy days. It is recommended that bicycle touring equipment such as packs and handlebar bags be manufactured in bright colors, such as yellow, orange, or red.


eXTReMe Tracker

 

Bicycle Touring
Tips & Advice

- Bike Stuff
- Camping

Touring Bicycles
Panniers
Racks
Saddles
Tires
Lights

Fenders
Tools and Spares

Tents
Sleeping Bags
Camping Mattress
Camp Stove
Water Filter
Pots and Pans
First Aide Kits
Solar Power
Bike Maps
Preventing Flat Tires

Bike Computer
Cargo Trailers
Kick Stands
Pedals
Handelbars/Grips
Headsets
Commuting Bikes

Camp Shower/Toiletry Bag

Lights

Helmet
Bike Shoes
Bike Touring Shorts

Stealth/Free Camp

What I Have Learned On The Road

Dreaming of Endless Travel

Injustice of Poverty

Much MORE Gear Here!

Sponsors (how?)


Cycle Touring Racks

Tents and ground cloths
Sleeping Bags
Camping Mattress Pads


Email Newsletter

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2002 - 2020 DownTheRoad.org (TM) All Rights Reserved

Find out how you can use my pictures on your web site legally and free of charge.